The Camera's Shutter Closes...

and a moment in time is forever frozen. Almost magically, with the touch of a single button, our people, our places, our pets; certainly, our true hearts, are captured and then treasured. 

 

Photo Tips

Five Quick-Pic Tips

Many times, a photo taken up-close versus far-away captures the mood and moment better. 

 

The next time you shoot, try moving closer to your subject. Think of filling the camera lense and your photo with just the head of your subject. You'll be sure to see every detail, which makes for a more interesting photograph. 

 

1. Create Close-Ups
2. Eye to Eye Images

Getting down to your subjects' level may mean bending down to the ground or even laying on it. 

 

The next time you shoot, try capturing the moment from your subjects' point of view. You'll be sure to see their way of the world, which makes for a more honest and probably more unique photograph. 

3. 'Vertical' Versus 'Horizontal'
4. Sun Signs
5. Center of Attention?

Turn the camera both vertically and horizontally to size-up the situation. 

 

The next time you shoot, turn the camera to a vertical position and shoot; then turn it back to its 'normal' position. By doing this, you'll be sure to capture the more natural boundaries of your photograph. 

 

Many times, the best photos are those that have the main attraction OUT of the center of the image. 

 

The next time you shoot, try shooting the MAIN subject off center. However, pre-focus your main subject by pressing on the shuter button lightly... then move your camera into position. This will insure the focus is on your center of attention, even though not in the center of the picture. By doing this, you'll be sure to create a more dramatic photograph.

 

Shooting into the sun is generally a photography no-no, unless you like silhouettes or dark photos.

 

The next time you shoot, make sure to check the position of the sun. It's best when the sun is behind the photographer. If the sun is to one side of the subject, for example, when shooting a portrait, use the camera's flash. The flash will fill in the other side of the person's face. Indoors, the natural light from a northern window works best. Also, early morning and late afternoon light often create the best photographs. By doing this, you'll be sure not to spoil an otherwise perfect photograph.